Tag Archives: qualities of business analyst

Seven Habits of a Successful BA

In the current working culture and a cut-throat competition everyone is putting hard to be a out-performer  There is a vast difference between the task performed by a professional rather than an amateur. This difference in quality of work comes with the experience and the process followed by an expert. As they say, “I don’t know the reason of success, but certainly failed becauseseven-habits of pleasing everyone”. A professional believes in his way of working and each time gets recognized among the peers and subordinates and also at the senior levels.

There is no hidden magic behind being a successful BA but because of the highly valued skills and competence level separates a successful rather star BA from the crowd. There are many qualities a BA should possess as his responsibility is quite distinguished and vary at different levels of the work performed and among different hierarchy levels. But I believe that these qualities to be a successful BA can be developed if s/he follows certain habits. I can think of 7 such habits which a successful BA should possess.

1)     Believe in eliciting rather gathering:

Requirement gathering is the foremost quality of any business analyst, but the important aspect is how smartly the work is done so that there is no ambiguity in the final version of the requirement details. Hence it is always recommended that a BA should think of certain different methods to collect the information from different stakeholders. The detail of requirement gathering is well explained in BABOK but I think eliciting the requirement is rather more important in this aspect. A successful BA always believes in eliciting the requirements using certain tactics like prototyping, brainstorming, interviewing etc. The elicitation always moors the BA from getting wrong information. Continue reading

Business Requirements Document: An Overview

Business Requirements Document (BRD)

BRD-documentBRD, an acronym of Business Requirements Document is widely accepted structured document for project requirements which defines what should be delivered in order to gain value in the project. This document is designed to assist with the project management and the implementation during the entire life cycle of the project. Business requirements are consist of both functional and non-functional requirements which lead to creation or update of product, system or a software. BRD mainly emphasize on what should be the end result and it doesn’t bother how the objective is achieved.

There are many variants of BRD known to people like SRS (System Requirement Specification) or SRD (System Requirement Document) and FSD (Functional Specification Document). BRD can be described as a mode of communication in completion of a project. The main objectives of a BRD are as below:

 

  1. It should be simple and all the involved stakeholders should agree to it.
  2. It should contain more business requirements rather than technical requirements, as the main motto of a BRD is what to achieve and not how to achieve.
  3. It should describe the business needs in clear and concise manner.
  4. It should have a logical flow and can be used as an input for next phase of the project.

Continue reading

Importance of Business understanding for business analysts

Understanding the business is one of the important qualities of a business analyst. You should know the essential background and foundation of the business you are working with. Having domain knowledge is advancement in the understanding in the field the organization is working. I don’t believe that BAs should be domain experts but if they have an overview of the domain, it can always be helpful in taking critical business decisions. So we can say in talking with business experts the communication skills are not the only requirement, you should also have domain knowledge in order to explain the business terms. You being finance expert would not be able to take decisions in telecom domain but that doesn’t mean you can’t understand the profit-loss definition. Business domain knowledge enables an analyst to be more efficient. While an analyst that is gifted with analysis skills and techniques might be able to do an adequate job without deep business domain knowledge, it’s reasonable to think that an analyst that does have a strong sense of business context should be able to more quickly determine the right questions to ask, and the right approach for handling business challenges.

A lower level to domain knowledge begets subject matter expertise. The type of work done decides the expertise you gain in any stream. A BA with the deep knowledge in any of the business domains and a specific area will be able to pinpoint the nitty-gritties of the business and help in taking the quick and reliable decisions. But I would say that doesn’t mean if you are a generalist you cannot take quick decisions. A debate on being specialist and generalist is never ending and thus depending on the organizational needs and requirements both are valuable. Continue reading